Eshine cleans up in Winnipeg

You’re out at the club with your friends, and having a good time. The music is good, the company is better and you’re a little sad when the night ends and the music stops and you have to go home. You pile into a cab with some of your friends, and head off into the night, either for sleep or onto your next adventure.

Behind you, the club now sits empty, with the exception of everything left behind and the mess left to be cleaned. And trust me, it’s a big mess.

That’s where Elias Torres and eshine come in and start cleaning; working through the night while most people are busy sleeping.

Hard work and humble beginnings
Eshine got its start in 2012 when a cleaning opportunity presented itself to Elias and some of his friends. Elias stepped forward, and it began.

“I grabbed the vacuum cleaner from my parents’ place and their cleaning supplies and just went from there.”

“I was 24 years old when I started,” said Elias. “I actually had a bunch of different jobs and wasn’t sure what it was going to do. A buddy of mine had a business that needed cleaning. I stepped up and said ‘I’ll do it’, because I needed the money at that time. So after having that one job done, I said ‘well I have that one, maybe I can get another one’ and it just kind of snowballed.”

“I did it for at least a year by myself, and I used to wake up at two or three in the morning, then I’d go do my full-time job then going back in the evenings.”

“When I started getting other clients, I decided that maybe it would be nice to do with someone else.”

Elias hired his brother, his friends and his girlfriend (now fiancée).

“We were all just growing together. I’d get these contracts and I’d offer my friends ‘hey, do you want extra money?’”

Elias and his work crew cater to their regular customers, as well as one-off contracts that come up, and the more work there is to do, the more eshine grows.

“My ultimate goal is to be able to franchise to other cities. Hopefully that’s something I can do within the next ten years.”

Outside influences
Elias cites Dylan Dufort of Picture Perfect Window Cleaning in Winnipeg as a mentor who has helped him as eshine has grown.

“When you’re in the same industry, it helps to have someone who has that experience, and is willing to encourage you to go after the big contracts that you might have been hesitant to without that support. It’s been awesome.”

Online business guru Gary Vaynerchuk, better known online as Garyvee, has also provided a source of continued inspiration for Elias.

It Ain’t Easy Being Clean
“Winnipeg can be a very dirty place in the winter time,” said Elias. “Snow and sand on people’s shoes and boots makes for a bigger mess, and it takes longer to do. Not everyone realizes just how big of a mess there is, or how big of a job it is to clean it.”

Elias says that nightclubs are among the dirtiest places eshine cleans on a year-round basis, and that you find all sorts of things when the house lights come on.

“It’s always nice when you find someone’s phone and you’re able to make their day by calling them and getting it back to them.”

Providing Opportunity to New Canadians
When looking for new employees for eshine, Elias’ first step is to go to the Immigrant Centre, which provides work opportunities for immigrants and refugees that are new to Canada.

“I’m Latino; that’s my background. My parents were cleaners back in the day, that’s how they started. When you go down to California you see these people doing these jobs that nobody else is doing. In Canada, a lot of them are doing the same thing. They just need the opportunity to work.”

Elias hires people based on their proximity to contracted clients, so that they don’t have to worry as much about transporting themselves to the workplace.

Eshine can be found online at eshinecleaning.com, on Facebook at eshine Cleaning Services and on Instagram at eshinewinnipeg. If you or your business is looking for a cleaning company, be sure to check them out.

LKB Photography: Shooting for the Stars

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Lisa Brezinski

When Lisa Brezinski’s friends saw that she had named her new photography business LKB Photography, they assumed that LKB must have been Lisa’s initials. In fact, they are the initials of her father Larry, who passed away suddenly in December of 2009.

“He was a hobby photographer his whole life,” said Lisa. “He worked for MTS for 30 years and had his own business. Photograph was just something that he loved and thought was really fun.”
Lisa had never been allowed to use her father’s high-end camera equipment while he was alive. Each piece of equipment was monogrammed with his initials: LKB. A few weeks after his death, she picked up his camera and began shooting.

“I was always interested in it, and it also happened that he had the best of the best equipment.”

Lisa soon found she had a natural gift when it came to taking frames. While she didn’t have her father’s technical know-how, this skill took her far. The technical know-how came with time.

Lisa began by photographing her friends from work. Soon, her family and friends soon encouraged her to register a business name.

“Immediately, I knew it was going to be LKB Photography. Not a lot of people know it’s for my dad.”

Lisa’s first paid gig was a maternity shoot in mid-2010, and reviews were very strong from the start.

“Even if I didn’t really know what I was doing at that point I always knew what I wanted it to look like and people loved that.”

From Winnipeg Weddings to Models in Los Angeles
“I had given myself a five-year goal of shooting a wedding. It’s the biggest day of someone’s life and I didn’t think I was going to be ready. But six months later I’m shooting two of them.”

Lisa’s work got noticed, and she was picked up by Wedding Bells magazine in Winnipeg.

“I can appreciate beautiful wedding photography, but that’s not what I was inspired by.”

Lisa hit a wall in December of 2014, tempted to quit photography altogether. Her lack of passion for wedding photography, coupled with the fact she had 12 coming up on her schedule, led her to realize that her photography didn’t reflect her or her style. A friend encouraged her to shoot what she loved, and see what came from it.
In January 2015, Lisa did some boudoir photo-shoots and posted the results to her Instagram page.

“The results were almost instant,” said Lisa. “My phone blew up, my email blew up. I got an opportunity with a fitness company to start working with them. Once the fitness companies started, that’s when a model came in from L.A. She came in, I met her, she saw my work, we shot together and the next week I was in L.A. with her.”

With that came new opportunities, and Lisa has been travelling to and from the ‘City of Angels’ ever since.

Flying back and forth
As a self-described homebody, Lisa notes that flying out to California on a regular basis has resulted in the biggest personal growth of her life.

“It makes you step outside your comfort zone. You have to be ready to go in an instant and it’s just a really fun life.”

Meeting models and people she grew up idolizing has resulted in one of the bigger realizations of Lisa’s time in photography.

“They’re just normal people. What we see on TV and in Hollywood, that doesn’t exist. We look at people on TV like they’re so far away and so different, but they’re the exact same as all of us.”

New Growth, New Stuff
In the past few months, Lisa has started cross-promoting with fashion companies, which means items getting sent for the models to wear. This has opened Lisa’s eyes to future possibilities.

“My ultimate goal is to be in L.A. full-time, and getting to shoot what I love. I want to start working with big fashion companies. What’s nice about that is you have the production behind it. Nobody realizes what goes into a shoot. It’s planned for weeks. We have hair, makeup, stylist and tanning people. It’s such a big production. I want something where I can put all of my creativity into a big well-paid job every time.”

Back Home
“When I’m in Winnipeg I still take all bookings, other than weddings due to the time commitment. Couples portraits, maternity, baby, and a lot of real estate photography. It’s a good balance, the houses don’t talk back to you,” said Lisa, with a laugh.

InstaFamous
Lisa’s posts on Instagram have resulted in worldwide popularity, 93 thousand followers (as of press time) and increased the demand for her among models. In the male dominated world of photography in Los Angeles, many seek her out for the bond and trust they can develop with her.

If you want to check out Lisa’s work, it’s available to be seen on her Instagram page at the handle @lkbphotography. You can also check out her website at lkbphotography.ca

Fast Air helping businesses grow through chartered flight

From its beginnings in 1995, Fast Air has grown to use many more planes and have more than 130 employees on staff across five business units (aircraft charter, aircraft management, helicopters, medevac and maintenance).

“Fast Air started as a response to charter opportunities,” said Dan Rutherford, Fast Air’s manager of marketing and business development. “(Fast Air Owner and CEO) Dylan Fast was a pilot, flying for somebody else and saw an opportunity. He got permission from the owner to use their aircraft and that grew and that relationship continues to this day. We continue to manage one or two aircraft for that original company. Now we operate seven or eight jets, ten or eleven King Airs (Beechcraft) and service a whole number of sectors from government, to utilities to manufacturers that are competing in the North American market and are based here in Winnipeg.”

Fast Air has also started maintenance and modification of Beechcraft King Air aircraft; a growing part of our business that is creating a lot of new jobs and opportunities.

“Fast Air started as an air charter business, and is still a cornerstone of what we do, but is part of five business units,” said Rutherford. “Now there’s aircraft management, which allows a company to have an aircraft at their disposal without all the complications like crewing it, maintaining it, data communication to various authorities. We do all of that in house, and provide a flight department of sorts for businesses.”

Business Tool
“Just the other day, one of the owners was here and he said ‘this aircraft is really a business tool for me. I’m able to do projects I could never do if I didn’t have it’.”

Chartered flights may not have the same prominence in Canada as they do in the United States, but their importance for businesses is equal.

“Charter gives access to many, many times more airports than larger airliners,” said Rutherford. “We can go anywhere with a serviceable airport, which allows us to fly direct to many more locations.”

“Clients will say to us ‘tomorrow we need to go to Toronto, Atlanta and Phoenix’. So our team will be behind the scene dealing with all the customs, airports, hotels and fuel. This allows our clients to roll up in their cars and go, often taking a team of people with them.”

Rutherford adds that in the U.S., for a long time, people have seen aircraft as a tool for doing business. In Canada, potentially because it’s not done as often, there seems to be a perception that some people see it as a perk for high income earners.

“We’ve been trying to work to change that perception,” said Rutherford. “Some of the owners of aircraft we are managing are key in the messaging when they tell other business owners ‘we are able to do business in ways we couldn’t before’ thanks to the use of chartered planes. It’s definitely an expense, but it opens opportunities that aren’t there otherwise.”

Purchase of Esso Avitat
As Fast Air has grown, aircraft management, aircraft maintenance, and medevac (at four locations with 24-hour flight and medical crews) have been added to services it provides.

Fixed based operator (FBO) Esso Avitat became available just down the road from Fast Air, so the company recently acquired the fuel supplier.

“It’s really a big benefit to have a fuel source we could have more control over,” said Rutherford. “We’re just in the process of our integration with the company. The integration has provided new opportunities, and new jobs.

“The Esso Avitat has serviced the Winnipeg community for a long time. They’re a great company and a great addition to us. Their whole team has stayed on and we’re excited to work with them.”

The Future of Fast Air
So what does the future have in store for Fast Air?
“We continue to upgrade our equipment, which keeps us competitive nationally,” said Rutherford. “If we charted our growth over the last ten years, we’ve gone from 30 to 130 employees, and we will continue to grow. We constantly strive to improve our facilities and hire good people.” 

So You Want to Be A KINESIOLOGIST

kinesiologistWhat happens when you go to a kinesiologist?
First, you get to keep your clothes on – big bonus!
Second, the doctor reviews your lifestyle and medical history.
He then moves your arms and or legs into different positions, applying gentle pressure.
This gives him information about your muscles and how they are responding.

Kinesiology, or human kinetics, is the study of human movement.

So what, you say. How does that get me a job?

The answer is that if you’re interested in being an athletic coach, a personal physical trainer or want to design athletic equipment, kinesiology is your course of study. If you are interested in rehabilitation services, working with the elderly or cardiac patients, kinesiology should be on your learning list.

Even if your goal is computer animation, the study of human kinetics can only enhance your ability to produce lifelike images.

Most of the above postings take self-confidence and leadership ability. You should be strong enough to lift fifty pounds or more if you are working with patients. And being able to work as a team is an important skill if you are interested in the medical side of the employment possibilities.

To be a full blown kinesiologist, it helps to have a background in physiology, anatomy, biomechanics, biomedical engineering, and psychology; at any rate, you need four years of post-secondary education to get into the schools of kinesiology and you should enjoy scientific research.

Canada grants a professional designation to kinesiologists; the U.S. does not. The world’s first kinesiologist department was developed at the University of Waterloo. Created out of the study of chiropractic medicine, modern kinesiology was developed in the 1960s. An American chiropractor, Dr. George Goodheart discovered that muscle testing could reveal vital information about what was happening to the body.

The practice aims to restore balance in the body. According to the International College of Kinesiology, “When kinesiologists are faced with pain or a knotted-up muscle they test several muscles for equality of strength on both sides of a joint (or the spine). If they test and find a muscle tests weak on one side of the body compared with the same muscle on the other side, they work with body energy reflexes to re-strengthen the weak muscle.” Kinesiologists call this muscle balancing.

Imbalance can exist nutritionally, emotionally, physically or chemically all of which will manifest itself in muscular stress.

There are many places in Canada that offer studies in kinesiology: University of New Brunswick, University of British Columbia, University of Manitoba, University of Alberta, Queens University, Western and McGill, to mention just a few. Red Deer College also offers a certificate course in Kinesiology with their sports program.

Although the study of this science goes back to Aristotle (384 to 322 BC) who is called the Father of Kinesiology, kinesiology is a bit of a new-age approach to medicine, taking into account the whole body rather than just treating a specific symptom in one part. It will no doubt be at the leading edge of medical studies for the future, especially in a day of an aging population where movement and how to maintain it becomes increasingly important.

Securing our Energy Internet

The future battle for renewable energy and cleantech advocates may not exactly be with oil and gas executives, or apathetic politicians, but rather to fend off breaches in privacy and digital security. Continue reading Securing our Energy Internet

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