Tag Archives: manitoba

Preserving indigenous languages one app at a time

Ogoki Learning Inc. is the world leader when it comes to language apps

Canada’s Aboriginal languages are many and diverse, and their importance to indigenous people immense. During the past 100 years or more, nearly ten, once flourishing languages have become extinct; at least a dozen more are on the brink of extinction. When these languages vanish, they take with them unique ways of looking at the world.

Ogoki Learning Inc. is trying to preserve indigenous languages one app at a time.

It all started when Darrick Baxter, President of Ogoki Learning, created an Ojibwe language app for smartphones and tablets. Soon after the release, he noticed the app was doing what he hoped it would, teaching kids the Ojibwe language while keeping them engaged through mobile devices.

From that moment Baxter, who grew up in Winnipeg’s North End, knew he had to share the app with everyone, so he released the app for free.

Continue reading Preserving indigenous languages one app at a time

Manitoba teams bring home gold at NAHC 2017

Team Manitoba mens and womens hockey teams each took home gold medals at the National Aboriginal Hockey Championships earlier this month in B.C.

It’s the first time since the inception of the tournament in 2001 that both teams have won gold at the same tournament.

Continue reading Manitoba teams bring home gold at NAHC 2017

The Extreme Costs of Extreme Weather

Have you noticed the weather getting weirder in recent years? Well, you are not alone.

From more heatwaves, cold, droughts; floods, and more oddities, including thunderstorms in Ontario in late February, the dice has become loaded with climate change helping to fuel more of these extreme weather events.

These events have an impact financially on government coffers globally.

Continue reading The Extreme Costs of Extreme Weather

Camp Hughes: Manitoba’s forgotten military base

One of the last trench systems of World War 1 lies mostly untouched, but for the work of time that has made the trenches that zig zag across the ground into little more than ruts in some places.

Gone are the sandbags, the guns and the men who once called this place home for extended periods of time.

This place is in Manitoba, not far from Highway 1. Continue reading Camp Hughes: Manitoba’s forgotten military base

So You Want to Be A KINESIOLOGIST

kinesiologistWhat happens when you go to a kinesiologist?
First, you get to keep your clothes on – big bonus!
Second, the doctor reviews your lifestyle and medical history.
He then moves your arms and or legs into different positions, applying gentle pressure.
This gives him information about your muscles and how they are responding.

Kinesiology, or human kinetics, is the study of human movement.

So what, you say. How does that get me a job?

The answer is that if you’re interested in being an athletic coach, a personal physical trainer or want to design athletic equipment, kinesiology is your course of study. If you are interested in rehabilitation services, working with the elderly or cardiac patients, kinesiology should be on your learning list.

Even if your goal is computer animation, the study of human kinetics can only enhance your ability to produce lifelike images.

Most of the above postings take self-confidence and leadership ability. You should be strong enough to lift fifty pounds or more if you are working with patients. And being able to work as a team is an important skill if you are interested in the medical side of the employment possibilities.

To be a full blown kinesiologist, it helps to have a background in physiology, anatomy, biomechanics, biomedical engineering, and psychology; at any rate, you need four years of post-secondary education to get into the schools of kinesiology and you should enjoy scientific research.

Canada grants a professional designation to kinesiologists; the U.S. does not. The world’s first kinesiologist department was developed at the University of Waterloo. Created out of the study of chiropractic medicine, modern kinesiology was developed in the 1960s. An American chiropractor, Dr. George Goodheart discovered that muscle testing could reveal vital information about what was happening to the body.

The practice aims to restore balance in the body. According to the International College of Kinesiology, “When kinesiologists are faced with pain or a knotted-up muscle they test several muscles for equality of strength on both sides of a joint (or the spine). If they test and find a muscle tests weak on one side of the body compared with the same muscle on the other side, they work with body energy reflexes to re-strengthen the weak muscle.” Kinesiologists call this muscle balancing.

Imbalance can exist nutritionally, emotionally, physically or chemically all of which will manifest itself in muscular stress.

There are many places in Canada that offer studies in kinesiology: University of New Brunswick, University of British Columbia, University of Manitoba, University of Alberta, Queens University, Western and McGill, to mention just a few. Red Deer College also offers a certificate course in Kinesiology with their sports program.

Although the study of this science goes back to Aristotle (384 to 322 BC) who is called the Father of Kinesiology, kinesiology is a bit of a new-age approach to medicine, taking into account the whole body rather than just treating a specific symptom in one part. It will no doubt be at the leading edge of medical studies for the future, especially in a day of an aging population where movement and how to maintain it becomes increasingly important.