Career training in aerospace industry

Above: founded in 1926, Tec Voc currently offers 19 technical vocational programs. Inset: instructor Terry Holowaty shows Grade 11 students Carl Fabros and Paige Croucher the basics of welding.
Above: founded in 1926, Tec Voc currently offers 19 technical vocational programs.
Inset: instructor Terry Holowaty shows Grade 11 students Carl Fabros and Paige Croucher the basics of welding.

By Cindy McKay

Would you be interested in a program where you can explore various aspects of high-tech jobs available within Manitoba’s aerospace industry? A program designed so you can keep working evenings or part time and train for a high paying career in this hot market? A program where they are open to training new Canadians and hope to attract more women into the industry? The Aerospace Manufacturing and Maintenance Orientation Program (AMMOP) at Tec Voc school may be just the program you are looking for.

Designed for mature students from 18 to 30 years old who are looking for a different career direction, the free 10-month program is ideal for students who are curious about the industry but don’t have the resources to invest in an education.

“The program continues to flourish and it just keeps getting better and better,” says Tec Voc High School Aerospace Coordinator, Greg Link. “We also have developed a cool partnership with Workplace Education Manitoba (WEM), when it comes to new Canadians who may have been involved in similar trades back in their previous country. The partnership is to upgrade their essential skills to meet the course requirements and it is a nice way for WEM to identify potential clients.”

Instead of investing tens of thousands of dollars to learn the skills, successful candidates can attend the 10-month training for free. Should they be hired, the rest of their training and educational needs are provided via the employer.
“Students who have attended this program and have gone on to other institutions for training are often the leaders in the group,” says Link.

In April, the enthusiastic Link took to the road to the surrounding schools within one hour of Winnipeg. He was recruiting Grade 12 graduates to consider enrolling in the adult program as it is a great transition for rural students who may not know which career path to follow.

“The program is a great transition for anyone who may be unsure about what they should take for schooling or considering a career change. The program does not cost them anything but builds up their skill set and fosters an understanding about the trades involved in the aerospace industry,” says Link. “If they are interested in engineering, the skills they will learn here will give them an advantage should they decide to pursue their studies elsewhere.”

The adult program can accommodate 50 part-time students per year. The early week classes run Monday, Tuesday and the occasional Wednesday and late week classes run on the occasional Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. Entrance testing occurs in May for the 10-month course that begins mid-August.
“It’s exciting as the 500th graduate of the program will be celebrated this year,” says Link. “Of them, 400 are still employed in the industry. StandardAero has employed the majority of our graduates while recently it seems that Boeing can’t seem to get our grads fast enough. The industry is booming faster than anyone expected.”

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